31 July 2007

Interessanter Beitrag, aber...

Dr. Blume hat für Evolution und Schöpfung einen Beitrag geschrieben, 'Warum ich als Christ und Wissenschaftler UD und ID gleichermaßen problematisch finde'. Der Tenor des Posts ist, dass man die Existenz eines Gottes weder beweisen noch widerlegen kann und wer das Eine oder das Andere versucht, damit die "Grenzen der empirischen Erkenntnisfähigkeit" überschreitet.

Während ich ihm weitgehend zustimme, habe ich mich doch über einen Absatz sehr geärgert:

Nicht minder furchtbar wirkten und wirken sich aber auch Evolutionsforscher aus, die aus der Biologie ein vermeintliches „Recht des Stärkeren“ ableiteten und die Gleichwertigkeit aller Menschen schließlich bestritten. Auch sie haben damit den Erkenntnisbereich der Wissenschaften weit überschritten und gewachsene Glaubenswahrheiten (etwa der Bibel) nicht nur hinterfragt, sondern vom Tisch gewischt. Und ebenso, wie auch IDs heute die Wissenschaft meist eher behindern als voranbringen, haben auch moderne UDs wie Richard Dawkins längst (und nach ihren Prämissen völlig logisch) wieder damit begonnen, über „Menschenzucht“ nachzudenken. Es gibt kaum etwas Neues unter der Sonne…
Das ist meiner Meinung nach reinste Propaganda.

Das *Evolutionsforscher* mit der Evolutionstheorie Rassismus oder das "Recht des Stärkeren" rechtfertigten, bestreite ich. Da hätte ich doch gerne Quellen zu. Dass die Evolutionstheorie von Machthabern dazu *missbraucht* wurde, solches zu rechtfertigen, das mag sein. Aber beide "Konzepte" gibt es ja nicht erst seit Darwin und auch die "Glaubenswahrheiten" der Bibel wurden und werden immer mal wieder dazu missbraucht, beides zu rechtfertigen.

Das Richard Dawkins begonnen habe, über Menschenzucht nachzudenken, ist eine Falschinformation, um es mal vorsichtig auszudrücken. Hier der Artikel, auf den er sich hier bezieht (warum kein Link?):

From the Afterword
By Richard Dawkins

IN THE 1920s and 1930s, scientists from both the political left and right would not have found the idea of designer babies particularly dangerous - though of course they would not have used that phrase. Today, I suspect that the idea is too dangerous for comfortable discussion, and my conjecture is that Adolf Hitler is responsible for the change.

Nobody wants to be caught agreeing with that monster, even in a single particular. The spectre of Hitler has led some scientists to stray from "ought" to "is" and deny that breeding for human qualities is even possible. But if you can breed cattle for milk yield, horses for running speed, and dogs for herding skill, why on Earth should it be impossible to breed humans for mathematical, musical or athletic ability? Objections such as "these are not one-dimensional abilities" apply equally to cows, horses and dogs and never stopped anybody in practice.

I wonder whether, some 60 years after Hitler's death, we might at least venture to ask what the moral difference is between breeding for musical ability and forcing a child to take music lessons. Or why it is acceptable to train fast runners and high jumpers but not to breed them. I can think of some answers, and they are good ones, which would probably end up persuading me. But hasn't the time come when we should stop being frightened even to put the question?
advertisement

Richard Dawkins is Charles Simonyi Professor of the Public Understanding of Science at Oxford University
Wo befürwortet er denn hier Menschenzucht?

Ich finde es schade, dass dieser ansonsten lesenswerte Beitrag (für mich) durch diese Propaganda abgewertet wird. Das wäre meiner Meinung nach nicht nötig gewesen.

MfG,
JLT



UPDATE 01.08.07: Michael hat in einem Kommentar einen Link zu dem Volltext des Richard Dawkins-Nachworts angegeben.

UPDATE 31.07.07: Ich habe noch ein bisschen zu der Geschichte des Richard Dawkins-Artikels recherchiert. Ich würde allen empfehlen, die die Behauptung aufstellen, er würde Menschenzucht befürworten, sich die entsprechenden Links mal anzuschauen.

How Predictable: Richard Dawkins Supports Eugenics von Wesley J. Smith

In den Kommentaren dazu meldet sich Richard Dawkins selbst zu Wort:

19. Comment #9524 by Richard Dawkins on November 25, 2006 at 2:36 am

This is the real Richard Dawkins, and of course I did NOT write Comment #9492. Nor, by the way, did I write any such article in the Sunday Herald, as Wesley J Smith alleges. I wrote something similar as the Afterword to a book by John Brockman (What's your Dangerous Idea?) but that book is not yet published. If any Scottish readers can explain to me the origin of the rumour that I wrote an article or a 'Letter to the Editor' (see http://www.lifesite.net/ldn/2006/nov/06112103.html) in the Sunday Herald (allegedly 19th November 2006) I'd be glad to hear. Was this 'Letter to the Editor' written by yet another impostor like the one who wrote Comment #9492?
und hier:

23. Comment #9554 by Richard Dawkins (real) on November 25, 2006 at 5:27 am

Comment #9547 by Clive Bradley: "Assuming comment 9524 is the real Richard Dawkins, and still left wondering what he thinks about eugenics, I am intrigued to know what the various members of the RD fan club leaping to the defence of their hero now think, knowing he evidently didn't write it in the first place."

As I said in Comment 9524, "I wrote something similar" in the John Brockman book, to be published next year. That clearly means that you may assume that the words attributed to me are correct, and you are therefore not left wondering what I think. (I just wanted to make it clear that I didn't quote myself in a letter to the Sunday Herald. To have done so in advance of publication of the Brockman book, without asking Mr Brockman's permission, would have been reprehensible. Apparently somebody else did quote me in the Herald, and it seems that they may have mendaciously passed it off as a letter from me. I still haven't managed to track down a copy of the Herald. I am still curious)

Now, Clive Bradley seems to be making a nasty little insinuation that what I said requires 'defence'. Why? Does Bradley have a PROBLEM with the following:- "I wonder whether, some 60 years after Hitler's death, we might at least venture to ask what the moral difference is between breeding for musical ability and forcing a child to take music lessons. Or why it is acceptable to train fast runners and high jumpers but not to breed them. I can think of some answers, and they are good ones, which would probably end up persuading me. But hasn't the time come when we should stop being frightened even to put the question?" Why does Bradley think that somebody who puts a QUESTION like that needs DEFENCE? What actually IS the moral distinction between breeding for musical ability and forcing a child to take music lessons. I said that I thought there probably is a moral distinction, but I thought people should at least ask themselves the question of what that distinction might be. Don't you think it is an interesting question? Do you have an answer to it yourself? Above all, why do you think somebody who asks such a question needs "defence"?
und hier:

27. Comment #9576 by Richard Dawkins (real) on November 25, 2006 at 7:24 am
Mystery solved. John Brockman has now informed me that the British hardback edition of "What is your dangerous idea?" was released last week (see Amazon.co.uk) and the Sunday Herald published extracts, including part of my Afterword. How 'Book Extract' mutated to 'Letter to the Editor' (http://www.lifesite.net/ldn/2006/nov/06112103.html)I don't know, and I guess it doesn't matter very much. I'm glad to have got to the bottom of it, and I stand by every word that I actually wrote.
Wesley J. Smith hat darauf seine Behauptung zurückgezogen ['I retract my claim that Richard Dawkins supports eugenics'] und auch erklärt, was ihn zu der Annahme verleitet hat:

Well, it seems that my post on Dawkins supporting eugenics was linked over at the Richard Dawkins official WEB site. In a comment to the post, Dawkins explains that the piece in the Herald was excerpted from an article he wrote in another forum. (It would have been nice if the Herald had explained that.) This means that Dawkins did not write the "Eugenics May Not Be Bad" headline, which is what caught my eye originally. Without that headline as a guide to interpreting his comment, his words take on a different tone. [...]
Aus der Zusammenfassung von Amazon zum Buch 'What Is Your Dangerous Idea?: Today's Leading Thinkers on the Unthinkable' von John Brockman:

The history of science is replete with ideas that were considered socially, morally or emotionally dangerous in their time. The Copernican and Darwinian revolutions are obvious examples -- radical, brilliant insights that did not so much push the envelope as rip it into shreds. These ideas were dangerous because they challenged our comfort zone. But what are the dangerous ideas of the twenty-first century? Which theories do the world's leading thinkers and scientists regard as too hot to handle -- not because the idea might be false, but because it might turn out to be true? Collecting together the very best contributions to the renowned Edge.org question from the most eminent respondents, WHAT IS YOUR DANGEROUS IDEA? is another endlessly fascinating and provocative insight into the bleeding-edge of intellectual endeavour.
Das lässt das ganze doch in einem ganz anderen Licht erscheinen. Die Recherche dazu hat übrigens keine 10 Minuten gedauert. Aber man hinterfragt eben nicht gerne, was man glauben will.

13 Kommentare:

ingo said...

Ja, ich gebe Dir vollkommen recht: Michael liest manchmal nicht genau.

Ich TEILE seine Ängste. Mit diesen Worten will Dawkins im Denken neue Spielräume eröffnen. Aber jetzt gleich zu sagen - und das tut Michael nicht allein!, das tut auch der "Zenit", die Zeitung des Vatikan - der Dawkins hätte Dinge vor, die mit unserem gegenwärtigen Begriff von Menschenwürde (etc. pp.) nicht vereinbar sind, das finde ich einen sehr weitgehenden, zu pauschalen und undifferenzierten Schritt.

Michael kann Sorgen äußern und er kann sagen, wie wir uns gegen das, was er befürchtet, schützen sollten. Aber er sollte Menschen nicht Absichten unterstellen, die ersten ganz und gar nicht zu ihren übrigen Habitus passen und die sie zweitens schlicht auch nicht geäußert haben.

JLT said...

@Ingo:

Ich habe noch ein bisschen zu der Geschichte dieses Beitrags recherchiert. Ich füge es als edit in mein Post ein.

nickpol said...

Da bringt Dr. Blume leider Ideologie ins Spiel, die er eigentlich aussen vor haben wollte, es sind leise Töne, aber den Ansatz höre ich. Das ist schade.
Andererseits, was sind den "gewachsene Wahrheiten" der Bibel? Sind sie wahr, weil über lange Zeiträume nichts anderes genommen wurde, oder artikuliert? Oder weil sie ganz einfach noch nicht hinterfragt wurden? So oder so, mit dem Begriff kann ich nichts anfangen, ich sehe keine Wahrheiten der Bibel, und schon gar keine gewachsenen. Schon wenn ich verschiedene Übersetzungen nehme, komme ich zu völlig verschiedenen Ergebnissen.

ingo said...

Vielen Dank, das sind SEHR, SEHR wertvolle Ergänzungen. Ich hatte den Sunday Herald Artikel auch gleich auf meinem Blog gebracht - nun ist man aufgeklärt, wie die Zusammenhänge sind.

Diese Sätze von dem Dawkins kamen damals wirklich ein bischen "wie aus heiterem Himmel".

Da wollten die Schotten wohl einen Engländer ärgern ...

Es ist immer wieder anregend, Dawkins in Kontroversen zu erleben. Er ist - fast immer - präzise. Ein unwahrscheinlich scharfer Denker.

Das fiel einem gleich bei den ersten Veröffentlichungen auf, die er überhaupt herausbrachte.

Michael Blume said...

Dawkins hat dafür plädiert, (wieder) über eine "moderne Eugenik" nachzudenken und die "Zucht des Menschen" nicht länger zu tabuisieren. Und erzählt mir nicht, er hätte nicht gewusst, was er da schreibt und über was nachzudenken er anregte. Den Unterschied zwischen Erziehung und Zucht buchstäblich "in Frage zu stellen" ist m.E. durch die Meinungsfreiheit gedeckt, aber ein klarer Angriff gegen das Konzept der Menschenwürde.

@ingo. Du wolltest auch nicht glauben, dass Dawkins Glauben pauschal als Geisteskrankenheit bezeichnet - bis ich Dir das Zitat beigebracht hatte. Dass Du jetzt auch hier wieder persönlich wirst ("Michael liest manchmal nicht genau") finde ich, offen gesagt, nur noch traurig. Was soll das?

@JLT. "Evolutionsforscher-Eugenik": Darwin war noch gegen "Menschenzucht", sein Vetter Galton hat bereits die "Eugenik" propagiert - die ja nicht nur in Deutschland, sondern in zig Nationen (darunter den USA) unter dem Siegel der "Wissenschaft von der Evolution" verbreitet wurde.
Nach dem Schock der NS-Zeit war lange Schluss - und jetzt krebst Dawkins (nicht umsonst eifrig um Abgrenzung von Hitler bemüht) an das Thema wieder heran. Das finde ich, wie gesagt, gedankengeschichtlich überhaupt nicht überraschend.

Einer der wenigen, der sich gerade auch als Evolutionsforscher diesem post-darwinistischen Mainstream entgegenstellte, war übrigens Alfred Russel Wallace, den ich (auch deswegen) sehr schätze.

@ UDs

Natürlich verstehe ich, dass jeder Vertreter seiner eigenen Weltanschauung nur im besten Licht sehen und Verfehlungen nur bei anderen erkennen möchte. Das ist menschlich.

Aber ich verteidige religiöse Fundamentalisten auch nicht, wenn sie z.B. "anregen", die Evolutionstheorie aus den Schulen zu verbannen oder über die Strafbarkeit von Homosexualität nachzudenken. Ich relatviere das nicht, sondern decke das auf und stelle mich dem entgegen.

Ich möchte Euch einfach bitten, nicht den Reflexen zu verfallen, die Ihr (zu Recht) anderen vorwerft. Sowohl im Namen der Religion(en) wie im Namen der Wissenschaft(en) ist unfassbares Leid geschehen und geschieht noch. Da haben wir alle Grund, hin und wieder auch nach den Balken im eigenen Auge zu suchen...

Michael Blume said...

@ nickpol

> Da bringt Dr. Blume leider Ideologie ins Spiel, die er eigentlich aussen vor haben wollte, es sind leise Töne, aber den Ansatz höre ich. Das ist schade. <

Echt? Wo?

> Andererseits, was sind den "gewachsene Wahrheiten" der Bibel? Sind sie wahr, weil über lange Zeiträume nichts anderes genommen wurde, oder artikuliert? Oder weil sie ganz einfach noch nicht hinterfragt wurden? <

Das ist ein Begriff aus der Theorie der kulturellen Evolution nach von Hayek: die Adam-Eva-Geschichte wäre z.B. ein Ausgangspunkt für die symbolische Wahrheit "alle Menschen sind gleichwertig, Rassismus ist abzulehnen". "Gewachsen" wäre diese Wahrheit im Rahmen der kulturellen Evolution insofern, da sie über tausende von Jahren (auch vor der Niederschrift) auch gegen anderslautende Traditionen erfolgreich selektiert und weiter gegeben wurde und sich also zu ihrer heutigen Form "gewachsen" hat. Auch der Begriff der "Menschenwürde" ist ein solcher Begriff, der sich ja nicht empirisch ableiten lässt, sondern aus der Summe von Traditionen, Erfahrungen und Überlegungen erwachsen ist, die dann zu seiner Konstruktion und Wertschätzung führten.

Der religiöse Mensch wird hinter "symbolischen Wahrheiten" einen göttlichen Willen sehen (wollen), Hayek (der selbst Agnostiker war) betrachtete sie als Evolutionsprodukte, die aber deswegen Achtung verdienen, weil sie sich offenbar immer wieder als überlebensfähig erwiesen haben und also auch für die Gegenwart und Zukunft relevant sein könnten.

Siehe hierzu auch:
http://religionswissenschaft.twoday.net/stories/3832481/
(Hayek-Frazer-Konvergenz)

Michael Blume said...

@ Ingo

Die Quelle des (von mir übersetzte) Dawkins-Zitat habe ich ja von Dir. Wäre es nicht fair, das zu bestätigen? Es ist das Original-Nachwort von Dawkins und nicht irgendein Zeitungsartikel, auf den ich mich nie bezog.

Hier für Dich, @JTL, nochmal der Link:
http://www.edge.org/documents/archive/edge214.html

Und hier der Absatz:

"The spectre of Hitler has led some scientists to stray from 'ought' to 'is' and deny that breeding for human qualities is even possible. But if you can breed cattle for milk yield, horses for running speed and dogs for herding skill, why on earth should it be impossible to breed humans for mathematical, musical or athletic ability? [...] I wonder whether, sixty years after Hitler's death, we might at least venture to ask what is the moral difference between breeding for musical ability, and forcing a child to take music lessons."

@JLT: Hier plädiert Dawkins doch ganz klar dafür, (wieder) darüber nachzudenken, ob man Menschen nicht auch züchten könne. Und etwas anderes habe ich doch gar nicht behauptet.

Zur Eugenik und wie sie von frühen Evolutionsforschern (wie Galton) gerechtfertigt wurde, hier aus dem Wörterbuch der Sozialpolitik:
http://www.socialinfo.ch/cgi-bin/dicopossode/show.cfm?id=175

Ich zitiere:

"Eugenik entstand sowohl als Wissenschaft als auch als soziale Bewegung. Die neue Wissenschaft der Eugenik sollte Regierungen darin unterstützen, sozialpolitische Maßnahmen einzusetzen, welche durch aktives soziales Eingreifen Degeneration verhindern sollten. Eine Vielzahl von "sozialreformatorischen" Gesellschaften aus dem gesamten politischen Spektrum sowie wissenschaftliche Disziplinen wie Psychiatrie, Anthropologie, Biologie und Sexualwissenschaft haben dem eugenischen Gedankengut vor allem in der zweiten Hälfte des 19. Jahrhunderts eine breite institutionelle Unterstützung verschafft. Mit der Entstehung der ersten Maßnahmen im Hinblick auf einen Wohlfahrtsstaat zu Beginn des 20. Jahrhunderts beeinflusste die Eugenik viele sozialpolitische Ansätze, speziell in den USA, Skandinavien, der Schweiz und später dann auch in Nazideutschland. Die Schweiz tat sich hierbei besonders hervor (obwohl "Eugenik" hier oft durch den Begriff "Rassenhygiene" ersetzt wurde), mit Pionieren wie Auguste Forel, Eugen Bleuler und Ernst Rüdin.
Maßnahmen wie eugenisch motivierte Heiratsverbote oder Sterilisationspraktiken betrafen psychisch Kranke, geistig Behinderte, allein erziehende Mütter, Fahrende und andere sozial ausgegrenzte Gruppen. In der Vorkriegszeit entsprachen eugenische Ideen der wissenschaftlichen Orthodoxie, obwohl ihre Übersetzung in die Politik umstritten war und vor allem von liberalen und katholischen Kreisen abgelehnt wurde. Obschon einige eugenische Praktiken bis spät in die Nachkriegszeit durchgeführt worden sind, wurde Eugenik durch ihre Assoziation mit der großflächigen "Euthanasie" von "minderwertigen" Personen durch Nazideutschland während des Zweiten Weltkriegs stark diskreditiert."

Nochmal: lasst uns als Wissenschaftler einfach so selbstkritisch sein, wie wir es auch von anderen (z.B. Glaubenden) verlangen. Und auch im Namen der Biologie ist schlimmes gerechtfertigt worden, wenn Erkenntnisgrenzen überschritten wurden.

JLT said...

@Michael:

Ich habe leider gerade keine Zeit zum Antworten, werde das aber heute Abend nachholen.

ingo said...

Naja, Michael, Du schriebst:

"Nimm seine" (Dawkins) "neuere Äußerungen zur Wiedereinführung der Eugenik und wir dürfen erahnen, welche 'Form der Freiheit' Glaubenden (also nach seiner Auffassung - Geisteskranken!) in einer dawkinschen Welt blühen würde.

Nicht nur theokratische, auch atheistische Weltanschauungen hatten ihre "Inquisitionen" und Andersdenkende wurden immer wieder gerne als 'geisteskrank' eingestuft (wenn sie nicht gleich liquidiert wurden)."

Das verstehe ich so, daß Du glaubst, daß in einer von Dawkins gestalteten Welt Andersdenkenden allerhand blühen würde - bis hin zur Liquidierung von Geisteskranken. Und das ist - oder wäre - natürlich ein starkes Stück. Solche Absichten Dawkins zu unterstellen. Sogar ein sehr starkes Stück.

Du weißt, daß auch Galton Liquidierung nicht als Mittel von Eugenik angesehen hat, möchte ich mal annehmen, oder?

Exaker formuliert hat Dawkins NICHT - wie Du wiederholt und wiederholt sagst - dazu "angeregt, über Menschenzucht nachzudenken", sondern über die Unterschiede von Erziehung und Menschenzucht. Ich denke, das IST ein Unterschied. Ein Unterschied, auf den ja auch Dawkins selbst wert legt, wie uns schätzenswerter Weise JLT vorgeführt hat.

Er hat also, um es genau zu nehmen, nicht, wie Du sagst "dafür plädiert, (wieder) über eine 'moderne Eugenik' nachzudenken und die 'Zucht des Menschen' nicht länger zu tabuisieren". Da es ein brenzliches Thema IST und da Dawkins selbst Wert darauf legt, was er präzise gesagt hat und was nicht, sollten wir uns nun auch daran halten.

Er stellt auch nicht "den Unterschied zwischen Erziehung und Zucht buchstäblich 'in Frage'", wie Du sagst, sondern er fordert darüber auf, nachzudenken, wo der Unterschied eigentlich liegen könnte. Und er deutet an, daß ihm dazu auch schon einiges eingefallen ist. MEHR nicht.

ÜBERHAUPT kein Angriff auf die Menschenwürde, zumal es unwahrscheinlich viel Eugenik gibt oder das, was man eugenisch nennen könnte, was mit Angriffen auf die Menschenwürde gar nichts zu tun hat. (Wird gegenwärtig übrigens auch wieder einmal ganz gut von Razib Khan auf gnxp.com diskutiert.) (Um nicht immer auf den wenigen Worten von Dawkins herumreiten zu müssen ... ;-) )

xxxx xxx xxxx

... "Glaube pauschal als Geisteskrankheit" ... - wie gesagt, auch da spricht Dakwins ETWAS differenzierter. Ich glaube nicht, daß er so ohne weiteres den Glauben an eine Hummel als Weltenschöpfer so aggressiv geisteskrank nennen würde. Und er sagt ja ausdrücklich im ersten Kapitel, daß er den "Glauben Einsteins" NICHT mit einbeschlossen wissen will in seine Behandlung von Glauben.

Also kann man auch das von Dir gebrachte Zitat nicht so allgemein interpretieren, wie Du es tust.

xxxx xxxxx xxxxx

Ja, Michael, natürlich kann ich bestätigen, daß ich den Dawkins-Beitrag so brachte. Die Vorveröffentlichung im Sunday Herald ist aber viel älter - das hatte ich, glaube ich, auf einem alten Blog mal behandelt im letzten Herbst. Und da war eben ALLEIN die Überschrift falsch und irreleitend.

Das hat mit dem, was wir hier diskutieren, nur insofern etwas zu tun, als der Sunday Herald mit der Überschrift ähnlich unexakt etwas in den Dawkins-Text hineininterpretierte wie jetzt Du. Offenbar aus großer Sorge heraus, oder um Propaganda zu machen, liest man leicht mehr hinein, als drin steht.

JLT said...

aus diesem Kommentar:

"Dawkins hat dafür plädiert, (wieder) über eine "moderne Eugenik" nachzudenken und die "Zucht des Menschen" nicht länger zu tabuisieren. Und erzählt mir nicht, er hätte nicht gewusst, was er da schreibt und über was nachzudenken er anregte. Den Unterschied zwischen Erziehung und Zucht buchstäblich "in Frage zu stellen" ist m.E. durch die Meinungsfreiheit gedeckt, aber ein klarer Angriff gegen das Konzept der Menschenwürde."

und aus diesem Kommentar:

"Und hier der Absatz:

"The spectre of Hitler has led some scientists to stray from 'ought' to 'is' and deny that breeding for human qualities is even possible. But if you can breed cattle for milk yield, horses for running speed and dogs for herding skill, why on earth should it be impossible to breed humans for mathematical, musical or athletic ability? [...] I wonder whether, sixty years after Hitler's death, we might at least venture to ask what is the moral difference between breeding for musical ability, and forcing a child to take music lessons."

@JLT: Hier plädiert Dawkins doch ganz klar dafür, (wieder) darüber nachzudenken, ob man Menschen nicht auch züchten könne. Und etwas anderes habe ich doch gar nicht behauptet. "


Hi Michael,

danke für den Link zum Volltext. Hier meine Analyse:

"Are there any dangerous ideas that are conspicuously under-represented in this book? I have two suggestions, both of which can be spun into either the 'is' or the 'ought' box. First, I noticed only fleeting references to eugenics, and they were disparaging. In the 1920s and 30s, scientists from the political left as well as right would not have found the idea of designer babies particularly dangerous — though of course they would not have used that phrase. Today, I suspect that the idea is too dangerous for comfortable discussion, even under the license granted by a book like this, and my conjecture is that Adolf Hitler is responsible for the change. Nobody wants to be caught agreeing with that monster, even in a single particular."

Zunächst mal, was sind Designer Babys? Laut Wikipedia:

"The colloquial term "designer baby" has been used in popular scientific and bioethics literature to specify a child whose hereditary makeup (genotype) would be, using various reproductive and genetic technologies, purposefully selected ("designed") to be the optimal recombination of their parents' genetic material. The term is usually used pejoratively to signal opposition to such use of human biotechnologies.[1]"

Und Bionet online:

"Advanced reproductive technologies allow parents and doctors to screen embryos for genetic disorders and select healthy embryos.
The fear is that in the future we may be able to use genetic technologies to modify embryos and choose desirable or cosmetic characteristics. Designer babies is a term used by journalists to describe this frightening scenario. It is not a term used by scientists."


Im Klartext: Bei "Designer Babys" wählt man aus befruchteten Embryos entweder das aus, dass die gewünschten genetischen Eigenschaften aufweist oder würde diese durch Gentransfer auf einen Embryo übertragen (wäre natürlich beides nur bei künstlicher Befruchtung möglich). In Bezug auf manche Erbkrankheiten, die auf nur ein defektes Gen zurückgehen, kann/könnte man schon heute screenen und/oder ein intaktes Gen auf den Embryo übertragen.

*Das* meint Dawkins mit Eugenik und das ist die "dangerous idea". Die Selektion von Embryos aufgrund ihrer genetischen Eigenschaften entspricht dem Vorgehen bei der Züchtung, dort wird auch bestimmt, welche Individuen zur Fortpflanzung gelangen und welche nicht. Dies ist prinzipiell möglich, darum begehen Wissenschaftler, die dies bestreiten, den ought-is Fehler, dass nicht sein kann, was nicht sein darf.

"The spectre of Hitler has led some scientists to stray from 'ought' to 'is' and deny that breeding for human qualities is even possible. But if you can breed cattle for milk yield, horses for running speed and dogs for herding skill, why on earth should it be impossible to breed humans for mathematical, musical or athletic ability? Objections such as 'These are not one-dimentional abilities' apply equally to cows, horses and dogs, and never stopped anybody in practice.

I wonder whether, sixty years after Hitler's death, we might at least venture to ask what is the moral difference between breeding for musical ability, and forcing a child to take music lessons. Or, why is it acceptable to train fast runners and high jumpers, but not breed them? I can think of some answers, and they are good ones which would probably end up persuading me. But hasn't the time come when we should stop being frightened even to put the question?"


Wenn man platt behauptet, dass eine "Züchtung" von Menschen nicht möglich wäre macht man es sich einfach und die Frage der Moral stellt sich erst gar nicht. Aber genau dass ist es, worüber wir uns nach Dawkins Gedanken machen sollten: Was *ist* der moralische Unterschied zwischen einer Auswahl nach der genetischen Eigenschaft "Musikalität" (oder, wenn das mal möglich sein sollte, der Manipulation eines Embryos, so dass er "Musikalität" erhält) und dem "Erzwingen" von Musikalität *nach* der Geburt. Er denkt, auf diese Frage (die ja nur ein pars pro toto für Designer Babys allgemein ist) gibt es gute Antworten, aber dafür muss es erlaubt sein, die Frage zu stellen. Damit wir uns über den moralischen Unterschied klar werden und uns nicht einfach darauf verlassen, dass es nie möglich sein wird.

zu diesem:

"Zur Eugenik und wie sie von frühen Evolutionsforschern (wie Galton) gerechtfertigt wurde, hier aus dem Wörterbuch der Sozialpolitik:"

Galton war nur kein Evolutionsforscher, er war, wenn man so will, Genetiker. Er hat die Vererbung von Eigenschaften bei Menschen untersucht. Auch aus dem Ausschnitt, den Du bringst, geht nicht hervor, dass Evolutionsforscher Eugenik gerechtfertigt haben.

"Darwin war noch gegen "Menschenzucht", sein Vetter Galton hat bereits die "Eugenik" propagiert - die ja nicht nur in Deutschland, sondern in zig Nationen (darunter den USA) unter dem Siegel der "Wissenschaft von der Evolution" verbreitet wurde."

Du sagst es doch selbst: Eugenik ist Züchtung. Da könntest Du eher Mendel als den "Schuldigen" identifizieren, weil er die Vererbbarkeit von Eigenschaften gezeigt hat. Dass Eugenik in den USA, dem Land, in dem es verboten war, Evolution zu lehren, angeblich als "Wissenschaft von der Evolution" verbreitet wurde, sollte Dir doch auch selbst komisch vorkommen.

zu dem:

"Ich möchte Euch einfach bitten, nicht den Reflexen zu verfallen, die Ihr (zu Recht) anderen vorwerft. Sowohl im Namen der Religion(en) wie im Namen der Wissenschaft(en) ist unfassbares Leid geschehen und geschieht noch. Da haben wir alle Grund, hin und wieder auch nach den Balken im eigenen Auge zu suchen... "

Ich habe nichts anderes in meinem OP gesagt:
"Aber beide "Konzepte" gibt es ja nicht erst seit Darwin und auch die "Glaubenswahrheiten" der Bibel wurden und werden immer mal wieder dazu missbraucht, beides zu rechtfertigen."

nickpol said...

@Ingo, Hayek ist ja wohl Ideologie genug.

ingo said...

Vielen Dank, JLT, für DIESEN Satz - er hat ein kleines Glühbirnchen in meinem Gehirn angeschalten ;-) :

>>> Was *ist* der moralische Unterschied zwischen einer Auswahl nach der genetischen Eigenschaft "Musikalität" (oder, wenn das mal möglich sein sollte, der Manipulation eines Embryos, so dass er "Musikalität" erhält) und dem "Erzwingen" von Musikalität *nach* der Geburt. <<<

Ich hatte nie kapiert: Ja, was denn: Erzwingt denn der Dawkins bei seinen Kindern Musikerziehung? Oder warum redet er davon? Das macht doch kein normaler Mensch mehr. Jetzt kapier' ich das erst.

Vielen Dank also - manchmal hat soooo ein verschwurbeltes Gehirn, daß man die simpelsten Dinge nicht mehr sieht.

Ich habe mich mit eugenischen Fragestellungen noch nie besonders differenziert beschäftigt, deshalb kam ich auch auf einen solchen simplen Gedanken (wohl) gar nicht.

Im Grunde lehne ich diese ganze "Künstlichkeit" aber ab: künstliche Befruchtung, Prenatal-Selektion etc. pp.. Man kann Fruchtwasser untersuchen, um zu sehen, ob das Kind schwere Erbkrankheiten haben wird (wenn die Eltern nicht gleich eine ordentliche Beratung vorher haben lassen) - aber alles andere kommt mir mehr oder weniger verkorkst vor.

Aber natürlich: Zur moralischen Bewertung müssen wir erst mal alle Dinge möchlichst ungehemmt zu Ende denken.

Wir können dann IMMER noch heftig moralisch empört sein. Aber erst mal müssen wir es nach allen Seiten hin durchdacht und verstanden haben.

ingo said...

Hayek? Ideologie?

Viele schätzen ihn sehr. Und dann muß was an ihm dran sein. Ich selbst habe versucht, ihm etwas abzugewinnen, bin aber bisher nicht weit gekommen.

Jedenfalls stand Hayek der Naturwissenschaft seiner Zeit sehr aufgeschlossen gegenüber. Das ist schon eher etwas, was gegen zu arges Ideologisieren spricht.